phishing

Phishing and Computer Security – What You Need to Know

Information Technology has changed the way we live our lives. What once seemed impossible is now possible. Like what? How about a global network of computer systems that allows almost instant communication at almost no cost to the user? Or free video conversations with your friends no matter where they are in the world (well almost).

But with the good also comes the bad and technology is true of this too. Computers and the Internet have led to a whole new brand of crime – cyber crime. All of a sudden the everyone in the world is connected to everyone else and computer crime spread very quickly because of this.

One of the main ways this new wave of criminals gets access to you and your personal information is through a process called Phishing. Using this technique they can get access to email and instant messaging accounts, bank accounts, retail websites and other accounts that safe information like bank balances, PIN numbers and other very sensitive personal information. Once these guys have this information then it’s game on and you’re going to pay the price.

This type of crime is on the rise and it’s all too easy to get caught out – some of the smarter ones in this game are going to be able to out smart you more than your computer program. This is happening every day right now in London, where police are seeing a rise in these types of incidents.

So what is phishing?

It’s a very basic way of obtaining someone’s login details without them being aware of how it works. This type of crime is on the rise and it’s important that you learn how to protect yourself against these types of criminals. Here are a few things you can do to protect yourself:

1. Contact your bank and just ask them to verify if they’ve received any requests for your account. If your bank knows of no charges being made they will help you determine if the person requesting the details is who they say they are.

2. Contact your credit card company and just ask them to verify if they’ve received any requests for your account. If your credit card company knows of no charges being made they will help you determine if the person requesting the details is who they say they are.

3. Contact your local police and just ask them to verify if they’ve received any requests for your account. If your local police department has a website where they post emails they might be able to help you get to the right place.

4. Even if you think it’s someone you know who’s requesting the information might be able to help you out. In the meantime just use your social networking sites and email to socialize with friends and family until you do know who is behind the stalking.

Just remember this:

If it seems too good to be true – IT IS!

5. Do not respond to those people who you think are contacting you.

You cannot trust them and they can’t hurt you if you don’t know them personally.

6. They can’t hurt you if you don’t know them personally.

7. They can hurt you if you give them your information.

8. They can hurt you with their own site or programs if you’re using Internet Explorer or if you visit web sites that are blocked.

9. Spyware, browser hijackers, adware and other browser exploits can hurt your computer.

10. Rut your kids about not giving out personal information online.

If you can’t rid your computer of viruses, you can help keep your computer safe and protected.

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